The Most Secure Way to Communicate? An iPod Touch!

iPodTouchIF YOU WANT to communicate really securely, you may assume you need some government level spy training, a high tech encrypted phone, or at least a custom operating system. Nope. Not at all. It turns out the most secure communications device available to anyone, anywhere, right now is the humble iPod Touch.

No, seriously. Even if that’s not at all what Apple meant for you to do with an iPod, the fact that it is not on a cellular network yet can run so much vetted software on a relatively robust operating system makes it a perfect device for secure communication. Whether you’re a journalist communicating with a source, a friend planning a surprise party for your hacker buddy, a philandering spouse trying to hide your Ashley Madison dates, or just a generally private person who wants to keep your communications away from prying eyes, the iPod Touch is a pretty simple option for staying private. With the right software, you can message people over mobile instant-message apps or make encrypted voice calls.

All it takes is making sure that the model is Wi-Fi only, scrupulously keeping it updated, following a few vital steps to lock it down, and, finally, installing an encrypted communications app. After that, you’ll be able to exchange seriously secure messages.

Wi-fi-Only Is the Key

Phones, by design, constantly call out to the nearest (or strongest) cell towers to tell the network where to route calls and data. This, of course, leaves a paper trail, and those location records are available to any government agency with a warrant or, in the case of more authoritarian regimes, simply for the taking.

This means phone calls or text messages are not the best option for secure communication. The iPod Touch eliminates this problem because it doesn’t use a SIM card or a baseband. There are no phone records associated with it, providing a significant privacy advantage over the iPhone and other phones, and making it less of a tracking device in your pocket. >more

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